Tag Archive for James DiEugenio

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In Case You Missed…

Some of our special stories from May focused on powerful institutions abusing their authority by making exaggerated, dubious or false allegations to justify punitive actions – from the U.S. government to the mainstream media to the NFL – while often covering up their own offenses and hypocrisies.

The Saga of Cesar Chavez

Cesar Chavez, founder of the United Farm Workers

Exclusive: The teaming up of United Farm Workers founder Cesar Chavez and Sen. Robert Kennedy marked an important moment in the fight for the rights of Latinos in America, a time in history brought to life by a film biography of Chavez, says James DiEugenio.

Right-Wing Pressure in Academia

Conservative pundit and publisher William F. Buckley Jr.

Exclusive: The American Right has gained substantial control of U.S. media but academia remains a juicy target as a vulnerable, last bastion of liberal thought and rationality, thus a key battlefield in the “culture wars,” writes James DiEugenio.

In Case You Missed…

Some of our special stories in March focused on the nuclear-war dangers implicit in the Ukraine crisis, Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s U.S. intervention to kill talks on Iran’s nuclear program, the role of propaganda past and present, and the way the national-security state influences public debate.

In Case You Missed…

Some of our special stories in February focused on the risks of nuclear war over Ukraine, the unpublicized suppression of dissent in America, some lost history around the Civil War, and the shocking connections linking Al-Qaeda, Saudi Arabia and Israel.

Ben Bradlee’s Not Such ‘A Good Life’ – Part 2

The Washington Post's Ben Bradlee in his later years. (Photo credit: Washington Post)

Special Report: In recent years, the Washington Post’s emergence as a neocon propaganda sheet has struck some as a betrayal of the Post’s earlier reputation as a serious newspaper. But many of the paper’s current tendencies can be traced back to its iconic editor Ben Bradlee, writes James DiEugenio in Part 2 of this series.

Ben Bradlee’s Not Such ‘A Good Life’

Longtime Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee.

Special Report: Washington Post’s editor Ben Bradlee, whose memoir was entitled “A Good Life,” is remembered by many as a tough-talking, street-smart journalist. But that reputation was more image than truth as the real Bradlee was an Establishment insider who knew which secrets to keep, writes James DiEugenio.

In Case You Missed…

Some of our special stories in January focused on the sophistication of U.S. government propaganda, Roy Cohn’s role in recruiting Rupert Murdoch, the worsening crisis in Ukraine, and the prosecution of another whistleblower.

Did North Korea Really Hack Sony?

A poster from Sony's "The Interview" starring Seth Rogen and James Franco.

Exclusive: The Obama administration has accused North Korea of hacking Sony in retaliation for “The Interview,” a goofball comedy about assassinating the country’s real-life leader, but the case may be another politicized rush to judgment by the U.S. government, writes James DiEugenio.

A Disappointing ‘Selma’ Film

selma-movie

Exclusive: At a moment when voting and other civil rights are under attack in America, a new movie “Selma” recounts the struggle, led by Martin Luther King Jr., to secure the African-American right to vote. But the film falls short in both telling key facts and conveying the drama, says James DiEugenio.