Foreign Policy

The Limits of US Military Power

Seahawk helicopters fire flares as they approach the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln in the Atlantic Ocean, Aug. 2, 2012. (Photo credit: U.S. Navy Seaman Zachary A. Anderson)

Official Washington’s new conventional wisdom is that the Obama administration is weak because it won’t launch military strikes against every adversary around the world. But the reality is that military force has done little to project U.S. power since World War II, writes Lawrence S. Wittner.

Ukraine’s Dueling Elections

A pile of "yes" votes at a Donetsk polling place favoring secession in the referendum on May 11, 2014.

Exclusive: Voters in two eastern Ukrainian provinces showed strong support for secession from the coup regime in Kiev, but the U.S. State Department and other regime supporters reject the outcome and vow to press ahead with a special presidential vote on May 25, Robert Parry reports.

Burning Ukraine’s Protesters Alive

Ukrainian Secretary for National Security Andriy Parubiy.

Exclusive: For the second time in a week, Ukrainian anti-regime protesters holed up in a building were killed by fires set by pro-regime attackers with ties to newly formed neo-Nazi security forces, reports Robert Parry.

Putting the Ukraine Crisis in Context

Russian President Vladimir Putin laying a wreath at Russia's Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on May 8, 2014, as part of the observance of the World War II Victory over Germany.

When the Ukraine crisis began, the mainstream U.S. media cast aside any pretense of objectivity and joined in the service of State Department propaganda. But – given the emergence of the Internet – a far more honest and nuanced story is possible to detect, as William Blum describes at Anti-Empire Report.

How the US Propaganda System Works

broadcast-networks

Americans are told that other governments practice censorship and propaganda, but not their own. Yet, the reality is quite different with many reasonable viewpoints marginalized and deceptive spin put on much that comes from officialdom, writes Lawrence Davidson.

Putin’s Subtle Message to Obama

President Vladimir Putin replies to journalists’ questions at a press conference with President of Switzerland and OSCE Chairperson-in-Office Didier Burkhalter on May 7, 2014. (Russian government photo)

Exclusive: Russian President Putin sought to cool the rhetoric over Ukraine with an appeal for a postponed referendum in the east and an order to pull back Russian troops, but another message was to President Obama – over the State Department’s head – that it’s time to talk, reports Robert Parry.

UN Syria-Sarin Investigator Voices Doubts

Ake Sellstrom, who led the United Nations' investigation into the Aug. 21, 2013 Sarin gas attack in Syria.

More doubts about last August’s Sarin attack in Syria are being raised by the U.N.’s lead investigator who questions the number of people actually exposed to the poison gas, suggesting the incident was much more limited than claimed, writes Gareth Porter for Inter Press Service.

What Obama Can Do to Save Ukraine

President Barack Obama uncomfortably accepting the Nobel Peace Prize from Committee Chairman Thorbjorn Jagland in Oslo, Norway, Dec. 10, 2009. (White House photo)

Exclusive: The fate of Ukraine – whether it descends into civil war or finds a path back from the brink – may rest with President Obama and whether he can work with Russian President Putin while recognizing the legitimate concerns of both eastern and western Ukrainians, writes Robert Parry.

Ukraine’s ‘Dr. Strangelove’ Reality

Peter Sellers playing Dr. Strangelove as he struggles to control his right arm from making a Nazi salute.

Exclusive: The horrendous fire in Odessa, killing dozens of ethnic Russians protesting against the U.S.-backed coup regime in Kiev, has lurched the country closer to full-scale civil war and disrupted the American media’s efforts to deny the existence of pro-regime neo-Nazis, Robert Parry reports.

American Hawks Who Never Learn

Columnist Charles Krauthammer

The mainstream U.S. news media has taken great umbrage over President Obama’s defense of the more peaceful parts of his foreign policy, when he suggested lessons were not learned by the many pundits and pols who supported the disastrous Iraq War, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar explains.