Foreign Policy


Israeli Rabbis Warn Kerry of God’s Wrath

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry answers a question from an Israeli reporter during a news conference in Tel Aviv, Israel, on June 30, 2013.[State Department photo]

Exclusive: Secretary of State John Kerry’s negotiations to resolve the generations-long Israeli-Palestinian conflict may look like a quixotic pilgrimage into endless frustrations to many. But it is causing worries among nationalists on Israel’s Right, Robert Parry reports.

Obama Ignores Key Afghan Warning

Gen. David Petraeus, as commander of allied forces in Afghanistan in 2010.

From the Archive:  As the 12-year Afghan War grinds to what many Americans see as failure, ex-Defense Secretary Robert Gates and other hawks won’t admit their counterinsurgency “surge” in 2009 was a waste of lives and money – or that U.S. Ambassador Karl Eikenberry was right when he warned President Obama, as ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern wrote in…

Should NATO Protect the Palestinians?

Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas

Israeli hardliners have long rejected the idea of a foreign peacekeeping force on the West Bank because it might restrict Israel’s freedom to attack Palestinians. But such a proposal is now on the table and has put Prime Minister Netanyahu on the spot, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar explains.

When the CIA’s Empire Struck Back

Rep. Otis Pike, D-New York.

Exclusive: In the mid-1970s, Rep. Otis Pike led a brave inquiry to rein in the excesses of the national security state. But the CIA and its defenders accused Pike of recklessness and vowed retaliation, assigning him to a political obscurity that continued to his recent death, as Lisa Pease recounts.

A Rare Indictment of US Atrocities

Playwright Harold Pinter. (Photo credit: Huntington Theatre Company)

Since World War II, the U.S. government has routinely sidestepped blame for the slaughters that have accompanied American foreign policy. One of the few high-profile condemnations occurred when playwright Harold Pinter accepted the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2005, as Gary G. Kohls recalls.

How Reagan Promoted Genocide

President Ronald Reagan meeting with Guatemalan dictator Efrain Rios Montt.

From the Archive: Both Republicans and Democrats fawn over the legacy of Ronald Reagan, who was born 103 years ago on Feb. 6, but the reality of his bloodstained presidency is much different from the pleasing memories. Reagan even promoted Guatemala’s genocide, Robert Parry reported in 2013.

Ronald Reagan: Worst President Ever?

Ronald Reagan photographed in a cowboy hat at Rancho Del Cielo in 1976.

From the Archive: Ronald Reagan, who was born on Feb. 6, 1911, ranks among the most honored U.S. presidents of modern times with his name etched into public buildings across the country. Even Democrats shy from criticizing his legacy. But is this Reagan worship deserved, Robert Parry asked in 2009.

How Misread Cables Fed Iran Hysteria

David Albright, former weapons inspector and founder of the Institute for Science and International Security.

Official Washington saw how bad intelligence led to the disastrous Iraq War, but U.S. analysts and “experts” like David Albright charged down the same path on Iran’s alleged nuclear program. Again, key “evidence” collapsed under scrutiny, Gareth Porter wrote for Inter Press Service.

Where the Real ‘Iran Threat’ Lies


The endless double standards demonstrated by U.S. pols and pundits toward U.S. “friends” vs. “enemies” have created a wildly distorted frame for a public trying to distinguish between genuine threats and propaganda themes, as Lawrence Davidson found regarding Iran.

Big Media Again Pumps for Mideast Wars

President Barack Obama holds a bilateral meeting with His Highness Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al Sabah, the Amir of Kuwait, in the Oval Office, Sept. 13, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Exclusive: Official Washington’s neocons still influence U.S. foreign policy despite their Iraq War disaster. Forever pushing what they view as Israel’s strategic needs, the neocons now are stoking fires of war against Iran and Syria by piling on old and new arguments, reports Robert Parry.