Human Rights


Pope Francis’ Appeal for the Future

Pope Francis. (Photo from Casa Rosada)

Pope Francis is pleading for world leaders to defend the rights of mankind and the future of nature against the power of corporations and the pillage of “free market” dogma, a warning about the planet’s survival that vested political and media interests reject out of hand, writes Daniel C. Maguire.

Congress’ Test of Allegiance: US or Israel?

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-New York.

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu has instructed the U.S. Congress to reject an international agreement constraining Iran’s nuclear program and to humiliate the sitting U.S. president, thus testing where the primary allegiance of most members of Congress lies, with the U.S. or Israel, writes John V. Whitbeck.

Spreading the Syrian Chaos

Turkish President Recep Erdogan.

Nearly two decades ago, U.S. neoconservatives put Syria on their “regime change” list and have maintained that goal to the present day, placing it ahead of even blocking the spread of Al-Qaeda-affiliated terrorism. That chaos has now drawn in Turkey as it advances its own geopolitical agenda, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar explains.

Rectifying Israel’s Crimes

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu held a security meeting with senior Israeli Defense Forces commanders near Gaza on July 21, 2014. (Israel government photo)

Israel’s original sin – the ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians – and the ongoing abuse of this subjugated population in the West Bank and Gaza undermine Israel’s preferred self-image as a modern civilized state and lead more people around the world to demand some modicum of justice, writes Lawrence Davidson.

Exposing Nixon’s Vietnam Lies

President Richard Nixon with his then-National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger in 1972.

Exclusive: After resigning over the Watergate political-spying scandal, President Nixon sought to rewrite the history of his Vietnam War strategies to deny swapping lives for political advantage, but newly released documents say otherwise, writes James DiEugenio.

Christianity and the Nagasaki Crime

The U.S. explosion of a nuclear bomb over Nagasaki, Japan, on Aug. 9, 1945.

Two of warfare’s great crimes were inflicted when the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing hundreds of thousands of civilians and – in the bitterest of ironies – wiping out Nagasaki’s Christian community which had survived long-term Japanese persecution, writes Gary G. Kohls.

‘Paint-balling’ the Presidents

The "paintballed" mural in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

In arguing for peace with Iran, President Obama noted he had waged war in seven countries, an admission that if made by, say, Vladimir Putin would have set off tirades, but underscores how routinely violent U.S. presidents have become, a point made by a “paint-balled” mural in Washington, says Sam Husseini.

Why Many Muslims Hate the West

An image of a Crusader killing a Muslim.

Exclusive: Many Americans and Westerners are baffled by the violent rage expressed by many Muslims, but the reasons for their anger are real, deriving from a “deep history” of anti-Islamic wars and colonial exploitation of the Middle East, as ex-U.S. diplomat William R. Polk describes.

How US Allies Aid Al Qaeda in Syria

President and Mrs. Obama disembark from Air Force One at King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh on Jan. 27, 2015, for a state visit to Saudi Arabia. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Exclusive: The dirty secret about the Obama administration’s “regime change” strategy in Syria is that it amounts to a de facto alliance with Al Qaeda’s Nusra Front which is driving toward a possible victory with direct and indirect aid from Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Israel, as Daniel Lazare explains.

Reporter Wins Fifth Amendment Case

The first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights.

The U.S. government’s recurring threats to prosecute journalists who receive classified documents may have created an avenue for some reporters to evade testimony at least in civil cases – by asserting a Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination, says Marcy Wheeler.