Economy

A People’s War in East Ukraine

Burning vehicles on the streets of Kramatorsk, Ukraine. (Screen shot from RT video)

Ukraine’s Western-backed coup regime in Kiev has launched an offensive against ethnic Russians in the east while a pro-regime mob used fire to kill some 31 anti-regime protesters in Odessa. Virtually all U.S. pundits favor the coup regime, but Daniel Patrick Welch offers a different view of the conflict

Net Neutrality Under Assault

Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.

The fight over Net neutrality is back, with the Federal Communications Commission considering new rules that critics say will create a fast-and-slow Internet, faster for those with more money and slower for those with less, as Bill Moyers and Michael Winship warn.

Could the Fans Own the Clippers?

Left to right, Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald T. Sterling, his wife Shelly Sterling and Clippers' President Andy Roeser. (NBA photo that has been removed from the NBA site.)

Even before Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling became known for his racism, he was recognized as one of basketball’s most inept executives with his team rarely making the playoffs. Now, with him banished from the NBA, Bob Katz wonders if there’s a way for the public to own the team.

FCC’s Threat to Net Neutrality

President Barack Obama announces the nomination Tom Wheeler, right, as Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, on May 1, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

President Obama has been a vocal defender of “net neutrality,” but a recent leaked report suggests that Obama’s FCC chairman is planning to divide the Internet into one with faster and slower speeds, as Free Press’ Craig Aaron told Dennis J. Bernstein.

The Fat Cats of Fast-Food

A protest for higher pay in the fast-food industry. (Photo by Annette Bernhardt)

Pay inequity has worsened across the U.S. economy, but perhaps nowhere more than in the fast-food industry where CEOs and other top executives fatten their compensation as their fast-food workers subsist on taxpayer-provided food stamps, as Michael Winship explains.

Why Neocons Seek to Destabilize Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Russian government photo)

Exclusive: Any propaganda war starts by planting stories that your target is getting rich, whether he is or isn’t, the latest move in demonizing Vladimir Putin. But the larger question is what might happen if the neocons succeed in destabilizing nuclear-armed Russia, asks Robert Parry.

The Iron Law of Oligarchy Returns

Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-first Century."

America likes to think of itself as a land of the Great Middle Class with a government “of, by and for the people.” But that reality has changed drastically over the past several decades, as money and power have created a dominant American Oligarchy, writes Danny Schechter.

Beneath the Ukraine Crisis: Shale Gas

Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs Victoria Nuland, speaking to Ukrainian and other business leaders at the National Press Club in Washington on Dec. 13, 2013, at a meeting sponsored by Chevron.

Exclusive: Behind the geopolitics pitting Russia against the West – and the ethnic tensions tearing Ukraine east and west – another backdrop for understanding this deepening conflict is the big-money competition for Ukraine’s oil and natural gas, writes Nat Parry.

America’s Surge Toward Oligarchy

Timothy Geithner (left), then Treasury Secretary, meeting with President Barack Obama in the Oval Office. (White House photo)

Exclusive: With the rapid concentration of wealth in a few well-manicured hands and the right-wing U.S. Supreme Court declaring money to be speech, the American surge toward oligarchy has gained what looks like an unstoppable momentum, as JP Sottile explains.

Foreign Entangling Sanctions

President Thomas Jefferson in a portrait by Rembrandt Peale.

The U.S. government prefers economic sanctions as the opening move in any international chess match with adversaries, but sanctions on Iran – and threatened ones against Russia – could disrupt energy supplies and hurt the West as much as the targets, ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar observes.