Foreign Policy

Caving In to Israeli Intransigence

A section of the barrier -- erected by Israeli officials to prevent the passage of Palestinians -- with graffiti using President John F. Kennedy's famous quote when facing the Berlin Wall, "Ich bin ein Berliner." (Photo credit: Marc Venezia)

Despite major Palestinian concessions for a peace deal, Israel’s dominance over the U.S. Congress and President Obama’s fear of political retribution enabled right-wing Prime Minister Netanyahu to sink negotiations and open the way into a new cycle of violence, as Stephen Zunes explains.

A New Generation of Nuclear Subs

An artist's rendition of the future SSBN-X nuclear-armed submarine. (U.S. Navy graphic)

Despite President Obama’s noble words about eliminating nuclear weapons, the U.S. government continues to modernize its nuclear arsenal, including major new investments in a dozen state-of-the-art nuclear-armed submarines, notes Lawrence S. Wittner.

Turning Japan Back toward Militarism

Shinzo Abe, leader of Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party.

The Obama administration’s much-touted “pivot” to Asia has a militaristic side that involves encouraging Japan to abandon its post-World War II pacifism and make its revamped military a U.S. ally in containing China, as Tim Shorrock explains to Dennis J Bernstein.

Renewed Violence Boosts Netanyahu

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

The day-in-day-out goal of Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu seems to be how to prevent the compromise and reconciliation needed to achieve a comprehensive peace. In that sense, the latest rounds of violence and hatred are serving his interests well, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar notes.

Confronting Terrorism with Peace

A U.S. Army soldier provides security at a school in Farah City, Afghanistan, on Aug. 1, 2012. (Photo credit: U.S. Navy Lt. Benjamin Addison)

Violent counterterrorism rides the wave of public outrage over the cruel behavior of terrorists, which is often exactly what the terrorists want, a downward spiral into more killing and mayhem. Some experts see the need for a more constructive approach, says Erin Niemela.

NYT Dishes More Ukraine Propaganda

Sen. John McCain appearing with Ukrainian rightists at a pre-coup rally in Kiev.

Exclusive: The mainstream U.S. media continues to sell the American people a one-sided storyline on the Ukraine crisis as the Kiev regime celebrates a key military victory at Slovyansk, an eastern city at the center of ethnic Russian resistance to last February’s violent coup that ousted elected President Yanukovych, writes Robert Parry.

An Insider’s View of Nixon’s ‘Treason’

President Richard Nixon addresses the nation about his bombing of Cambodia, April 30, 1969

Special Report: A recently released oral history by one of President Nixon’s secretive operatives sheds new light on perhaps Nixon’s darkest crime, the sabotaging of Vietnam peace talks so he could win the 1968 election, writes Robert Parry.

Obama’s Options on Iraq

Coffins of dead U.S. soldiers arriving at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware in 2006. (U.S. government photo)

Instead of sending U.S. troops back to Iraq to fight a resurgent Sunni jihadist insurgency, the Obama administration should put the squeeze on Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states to stop pouring billions of dollars into these radical groups, says Adil E. Shamoo.

The Cost of Iraq War Immunity

President George W. Bush pauses for applause during his State of the Union Address on Jan. 28, 2003, when he made a fraudulent case for invading Iraq. Seated behind him are Vice President Dick Cheney and House Speaker Dennis Hastert. (White House photo)

If Official Washington were not the corrupt and dangerous place that it is, the architects and apologists for the Iraq War would have faced stern accountability. Instead, they are still around – holding down influential jobs, making excuses and guiding the world into more wars, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar notes.

Itching for a Genocide

Screen shot of the fire in Odessa, Ukraine, on May 2, 2014. (From RT video)

Exclusive: A meeting of French, German, Russian and Ukrainian foreign ministers sought a new ceasefire in Ukraine, but the U.S. State Department and the mainstream U.S. media seem eager for more bloodshed, an unseemly rush into a war that could become genocide, writes Robert Parry.