Tag Archive for Michael Winship


A ‘Downton Abbey’ World of US Politics


U.S. pundits and pols often lecture other countries for their lapses in democracy, sometimes citing barriers that some candidates may face to get on the ballot. But American politics has its own major barrier, the need to raise lots and lots of money, as Michael Winship notes.

The One Percent’s Great Escape

Mr. Moneybags from the "Monopoly" game

F. Scott Fitzgerald once wrote that the rich “are different from you and me,” which remains true today except now they don’t even want to be around regular people, seeking more and more remote locations to escape from the increasingly angry commoners, as Michael Winship explains.

Backdoor Scheme Against Net Neutrality


With public opinion solidly behind Net Neutrality – and the Obama administration prepared to safeguard it – the Republican Congress has come up with a scheme to sabotage those regulatory protections, as Michael Winship explains.

Obama’s Modest Proposals

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, Secretary of State John Kerry, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, and Energy Secretary Earnest Moniz applaud as President Barack Obama enters the House Chamber prior to delivering the State of the Union address in the Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 20, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Obama struck a folksy tone during his State of the Union address, but there wasn’t much substance for the average folks – and even his fairly modest proposals for helping the middle class face determined GOP opposition – as Michael Winship describes.

Hypocrisy on Parade in Paris

Singer James Taylor performs "You've Got a Friend" onstage in Paris on Jan. 16, 2015, during a tribute to the victims of the Charlie Hebdo massacre. On the left is Secretary of State John Kerry. (U.S. State Department photo)

At the Paris procession honoring the victims of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, world leaders locked arms in defense of free speech – although many of the participants including the French have been busy cracking down on freedom of expression, notes Michael Winship.

NYC’s Riptides of Free Speech

Eric Garner being put in a chokehold by New York City police shortly before his death.

Amid Western government’s sudden enthusiasm for free speech, no matter how offensive, there is the angry police reaction in New York City to protests against some police officers killing an unarmed black man – by blaming the protesters for a deranged man’s shooting of two policemen, as Michael Winship describes.

Ayn Rand v. ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’

Actor Jimmy Stewart in Frank Capra's classic, "It's a Wonderful Life."

During the Red Scare of the late 1940s, novelist Ayn Rand and other right-wing zealots targeted Hollywood for supposedly subversive messages, like the criticism of bankers and the praise of community in Frank Capra’s “It’s a Wonderful Life,” as Michael Winship recalls.

Bought-and-Paid Congress Divides the Spoils

The U.S. Congress has balked at approving a war resolution against the Islamic State, while moving aggressively to derail negotiations to ensure that Iran's nuclear program remains peaceful.

Never has the Golden Rule of Politics glittered so bright: the corporate-person with the most gold rules. And the Republicans are now firmly in control of Congress after having their pockets filled more than the Democrats, as Bill Moyers and Michael Winship explain.

The Confusion Around Net Neutrality

President Barack Obama announces the nomination Tom Wheeler, right, as Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, on May 1, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

President Obama reaffirmed his support for “Net neutrality,” but his appointed FCC chairman Tom Wheeler continues to flirt with ideas for giving major Internet providers more options to charge extra for higher-speed service, reports Michael Winship.

Obama Boosts ‘Net Neutrality’

President Barack Obama runs onto a stage in Rockville, Maryland, Oct. 3, 2013 (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

The battle to protect “Net Neutrality” got a boost from President Obama’s strong recommendation to the FCC in favor of reclassifying the Internet as a public utility, but the newly empowered Republicans are demanding that private industry have more control, writes Michael Winship.