Right Wing

Why France Sank an Iran Nuke Deal

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius greets U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Paris, France, on Feb. 27, 2013. [State Department photo]

Exclusive: Saudis and Israelis wanted to sink the negotiated deal on Iran’s nuclear program, so the French launched the diplomatic torpedo to take it down. But behind France’s action were Saudi financial muscle and Israel’s political skill, reports Robert Parry.

A Showdown for War or Peace

Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the press in Geneva on Nov. 10, 2013, about the failure to reach an interim agreement with Iran on its nuclear program. (Photo credit: U.S. State Department)

Exclusive: Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu and Saudi intelligence chief Bandar are going head-to-head against U.S. President Obama and Russian President Putin on resolving crises in Iran and Syria, reports Robert Parry.

Sabotaging an Iran Nuke Deal

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the United Nations in 2012, drawing his own "red line" on how far he will let Iran go in refining nuclear fuel.

Israel’s leadership and America’s neocons are shifting into overdrive to block a plan that would put the brakes on Iran’s nuclear program, seeking confrontation, not conciliation, notes ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar.

The Future in a Dazzling Shanghai

The skyline of Shanghai, China. [Photo credit: Carl Lovén on Flickr]

The biggest winner from the U.S. government shutdown and near credit default may be China as it pushes for a “de-Americanized” world economy, a future on display in a dazzling Shanghai, writes Beverly Deepe Keever from Shanghai.

The Scandal of Scandals

President Richard Nixon, speaking to the nation on Aug. 8, 1974, announcing his decision to resign.

The term “scandal” used to mean something, a serious abuse of power or some truly outrageous conduct – Watergate, Iran-Contra, lying a nation into war – but the word has grown almost meaningless, just one more partisan insult, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar explains.

Kerry’s Saudi-Israeli Appeasement Tour

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a greeting from President Barack Obama during a meeting with King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia in Riyadh on November 4, 2013. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

Exclusive: Secretary of State Kerry is scurrying from capital to capital across the Mideast in what looks like an apology tour, seeking to soothe the hurt feelings of Saudi Arabia and Israel, but the appeasement may encourage more resistance to U.S. policies, writes Robert Parry.

Guns But No Butter

Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin

The Right’s war on the poor rages on, driven in part by the belief that racial and ethnic minorities are getting much of the help. Yet, as food stamps are slashed, Congress lavishes money on military projects that are judged wasteful or useless, John LaForge writes.

US Distorts Iranian Nuclear Rights

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at a press conference in Iran. (Official Iranian photo)

The U.S. government and Israel – itself a rogue nuclear-armed state – insist that the Non-Proliferation Treaty doesn’t give Iran the right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes. But the words of the treaty clearly say otherwise, as Flynt and Hillary Mann Leverett note.

Gunning Down a Boy with a Toy Gun

Andy Lopez, who was slain on Oct. 22, 2013, by a sheriff's deputy in Santa Rosa, California.

Exclusive: The Trayvon Martin case, in which a community watch volunteer killed an unarmed black teen-ager in a hoodie, roiled the U.S. last year. Now, a California deputy has gunned down a Latino boy carrying a toy AK-47, raising other troubling questions, as Dennis J Bernstein reports.

Taxing the Movement of Money

The symbol of the Internal Revenue Service.

If U.S. budget gridlock had not ground rational thought to a standstill, creative options for revising the tax code might be possible, such as a tax on stock transactions to raise money and discourage micro-second trades. Another option would be a toll tax on money movement, as ex-prosecutor William John Cox suggests.