Politics

Two Paths toward the Net’s Future

Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.

The battle lines over “Net neutrality” are taking shape, between an approach that would let providers offer pricier fast lanes and an alternative plan that would regulate the Internet as a utility to protect consumers, reports Michael Winship.

Trying to Scuttle Iran Nuke Talks, Again

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani celebrates the completion of an interim deal on Iran's nuclear program on Nov. 24, 2013, by kissing the head of the daughter of an assassinated Iranian nuclear engineer. (Iranian government photo)

Official Washington’s hardliners are back at it, pushing unrealistic demands about Iran’s nuclear program to ensure that a comprehensive agreement is scuttled and the military option is put back on the table, as Gareth Porter explains at Inter Press Service.

Death to the Death Penalty

A gurney used for  executions by lethal injection.

Oklahoma’s ghoulish killing of convicted murderer Clayton Lockett on April 29 has brought new attention to America’s continued use of the death penalty, a politically popular issue in some states but a practice that has many reasons justifying its abolition, writes Marjorie Cohn.

How NATO Jabs Russia on Ukraine

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

Exclusive: The U.S. mainstream media portrays the Ukraine crisis as a case of Russian “imperialism,” but the reality is that Moscow has been reacting to aggressive moves by Washington to expand NATO to Russia’s border in violation of a post-Cold War pledge, writes ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern.

The ‘Net Neutrality’ Fight Heats Up

fcc-symbol

The battle over the FCC’s plans for limiting “Net Neutrality” – and giving a speed advantage to the people who can pay a premium – is heating up as protesters bring the fight to Washington, writes Michael Winship.

Ethnic Russians Are People, Too

A Ukrainian woman voting in the May 11, 2014 referendum on independence for sections of eastern Ukraine. (Screen shot from RT video)

Exclusive: There’s an odor of prejudice in how the mainstream U.S. news media treats the ethnic Russians in eastern Ukraine, as if they are mindless beings, easily duped “minions” of Vladimir Putin. But this bias reflects more negatively on the U.S. press than on the people who are being insulted, writes Robert Parry.

Ukraine’s Dueling Elections

A pile of "yes" votes at a Donetsk polling place favoring secession in the referendum on May 11, 2014.

Exclusive: Voters in two eastern Ukrainian provinces showed strong support for secession from the coup regime in Kiev, but the U.S. State Department and other regime supporters reject the outcome and vow to press ahead with a special presidential vote on May 25, Robert Parry reports.

How the US Propaganda System Works

broadcast-networks

Americans are told that other governments practice censorship and propaganda, but not their own. Yet, the reality is quite different with many reasonable viewpoints marginalized and deceptive spin put on much that comes from officialdom, writes Lawrence Davidson.

Putin’s Subtle Message to Obama

President Vladimir Putin replies to journalists’ questions at a press conference with President of Switzerland and OSCE Chairperson-in-Office Didier Burkhalter on May 7, 2014. (Russian government photo)

Exclusive: Russian President Putin sought to cool the rhetoric over Ukraine with an appeal for a postponed referendum in the east and an order to pull back Russian troops, but another message was to President Obama – over the State Department’s head – that it’s time to talk, reports Robert Parry.

The Commandment to Save the Planet

Image of Planet Earth taken from Apollo 17

America’s right-wingers are so hostile to the federal government – and to the Constitution’s commandment to ”promote the general Welfare” – that they reject action even when needed to save the planet. A resistance that continues whatever the evidence, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar notes.