Media

Doubting Obama’s Resolve to Do Right

President Barack Obama.

From the Archive: As President Obama prepares to make another speech explaining his foreign policy, the question is whether he can climb out of the rut of his previous whiny apologies for continuing many of George W. Bush’s abuses, as ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern wrote last year.

WPost Seeks US-Patrolled ‘Safe Zone’ in Syria

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers remarks on Syria at the Department of State in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 30, 2013. [State Department photo]

Exclusive: Neocons never blush at their own hypocrisies, demanding Russia respect international law and do nothing to protect eastern Ukrainians, while demanding President Obama ignore international law and create a rebel “safe zone” in Syria, writes ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern.

The State Department’s Ukraine Fiasco

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses Yale University graduates on Class Day in New Haven, Connecticut, on May 18, 2014. Kerry himself is a 1966 Yale graduate. (State Department photo)

Exclusive: The State Department’s handling of the Ukraine crisis may go down as a textbook diplomatic fiasco, doing nothing to advance genuine U.S. interests while disrupting cooperation with Moscow and pushing Russia and China back together, reports Robert Parry.

The Proud Message of Utah Phillips

U Utah Phillips, labor activist and songwriter.

It is often forgotten that the path to the Great American Middle Class was forged in large part by labor activists and social reformers during the first six decades of the last century, a struggle that left behind a proud culture of music and stories that can inspire the present, as Richard L. Fricker recalls.

Reasons for Intellectual Conformity

President Woodrow Wilson.

In theory, many people hail the idea of independent thinking and praise the courage of speaking truth to power. In practice, however, the pressure of “group think” and the penalties inflicted on dissidents usually force people into line even when they know better, as Lawrence Davidson notes.

The Bloody Victory at Monte Cassino

The ruins of the Monte Cassino Abbey as they looked in February 1944 after the Allied bombing attack. (Photo by Wittke from the German Federal Archives)

Special Report: Seven decades ago, the Allies celebrated a hard-fought victory with the capture of Monte Cassino, but the huge cost in blood and the destruction of Saint Benedict’s famous abbey still make the battle controversial, as war correspondent Don North explains.

Can the Surveillance State Be Stopped?

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden speaking in Moscow on Oct. 9, 2013. (From a video posted by WikiLeaks)

Despite the public furor over NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations about U.S. government surveillance, the process rolls on unabated with few prospects of significant reform, writes Danny Schechter.

Two Paths toward the Net’s Future

Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.

The battle lines over “Net neutrality” are taking shape, between an approach that would let providers offer pricier fast lanes and an alternative plan that would regulate the Internet as a utility to protect consumers, reports Michael Winship.

How NATO Jabs Russia on Ukraine

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

Exclusive: The U.S. mainstream media portrays the Ukraine crisis as a case of Russian “imperialism,” but the reality is that Moscow has been reacting to aggressive moves by Washington to expand NATO to Russia’s border in violation of a post-Cold War pledge, writes ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern.

The ‘Net Neutrality’ Fight Heats Up

fcc-symbol

The battle over the FCC’s plans for limiting “Net Neutrality” – and giving a speed advantage to the people who can pay a premium – is heating up as protesters bring the fight to Washington, writes Michael Winship.