Foreign Policy

Economic Blowback from Iran Sanctions

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at a press conference in Iran. (Official Iranian photo)

Economic sanctions have notched some successes, like freeing Nelson Mandela and ending South Africa’s apartheid, but other sanctions have lost sight of practical reforms and become destructive ends in themselves, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar notes about Iran.

Real Journalism v. Big Brother

U.S. President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron trade bottles of beer to settle a bet they made on the U.S. vs. England World Cup Soccer game (which ended in a tie), during a bilateral meeting at the G20 Summit in Toronto, Canada, June 26, 2010. (White House photo by Pete Souza)

In theory, pretty much everyone claims to like investigative journalism, even government officials. But the reaction is different when reporters expose troubling facts, especially if they make a favored country or politician look bad. Yet, that is what’s needed, says Norman Solomon.

Why We Need Consortiumnews

Journalist Robert Parry.

From Editor Robert Parry: In late August 2013, the United States was poised on the brink of another Mideast war. The facts were murky about a chemical weapons incident in Syria on Aug. 21, but most American pundits and politicians were blaming the Syrian government.

Saudi-Israeli Alliance Boosts Al-Qaeda

President Barack Obama talks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel at White House on May 18, 2009. (Credit: White House photo by Pete Souza)

Exclusive: Saudi Arabia and Israel see Iran as their worst enemy, but that obsession is allowing al-Qaeda to reassert itself in the Middle East, especially in war-torn Syria, and that could open the West to a new round of terrorist attacks, writes Robert Parry.

Neocons Ignore Real Lessons of Munich

German delegates at the Versailles peace conference that brought World War I to an end but planted the seeds for World War II. (Photo credit: German Federal Archives)

The neocons are working overtime to overturn President Obama’s agreement with Iran to constrain but not eliminate its nuclear program. They are even referencing Munich in what ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar says is some very bad history.

US Shutting Down a Key News Source

James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence.

Exclusive: The U.S. intelligence community vacuums up vast amounts of data, but it has one agency, World News Connection, that gives back information to the public – except that the service is getting shut down at year’s end, notes ex-intelligence analyst Elizabeth Murray.

How Terror War Hurts Cuba Policy

Cuban leader Fidel Castro in 2003. (Photo credit: Antonio Milena - ABr)

The U.S. list of “terrorist” states has long been a sick joke, most notably by including Cuba (for domestic political reasons) and excluding Saudi Arabia (for financial reasons). Now, the list is undercutting policy goals, notes ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar.

Contra-Cocaine Was a Real Conspiracy

Journalist Gary Webb.

Exclusive: The 50th anniversary of the JFK assassination saw a mainstream media blackout of nearly all evidence of conspiracy in that case. But New York Magazine went even further, mocking the proven Contra-cocaine scandal as a “conspiracy theory,” Robert Parry writes.

The Neocons Go Nuclear

Daniel Pipes, Neoconservative writer. (Photo from Daniel Pipes' Web site)

The neocons are testing their remaining strength in Official Washington by firing off rhetorical bombs against President Obama and his interim agreement with Iran to constrain its nuclear program, including absurd comparisons to Hitler and Munich, writes Lawrence Davidson.

Double Standards for US War Crimes

Barack Obama, then President-elect, and President George W. Bush at the White House during the transition.

U.S. pundits cheer when some African warlord or East European brute is dragged before an international tribunal, but not at the thought of justice being meted out to George W. Bush or other architects of post-9/11 torture and aggressive war on Iraq, as John LaForge notes.