Budget

Tracing the Source of Income Inequality

President Ronald Reagan, delivering his Inaugural Address on Jan. 20, 1981.

Exclusive: Economist Thomas Piketty traces the explosion of income inequality in America to political decisions, especially the right-wing policies of Ronald Reagan who simultaneously slashed taxes for the rich and decried government intervention in the economy, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Hillary Clinton’s Hawkish Legacy

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

To the surprise of some, the U.S. State Department has emerged as the Obama administration’s most hawkish branch, out-toughing the Pentagon which has urged restraint at times as State pushes for war. This shift dates back to Hillary Clinton’s tenure as Secretary, reports JP Sottile.

Learning the Lessons of the 1 Percent

Ohio State University's University Hall.

America’s transformation into a bifurcated society of a few rich and then the rest is occurring in academia as well, with bloated salaries for top administrators combined with the exploitation of poorly paid “adjunct” professors and a financial squeeze on students, as Lawrence S. Wittner explains.

The Money Behind the Gun Madness

Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association.

Since the American Right succeeded in reframing the Framers’ “well-regulated militia” context for the Second Amendment, gun madness – punctuated by frequent mass slaughters – has become the U.S. nightmare. But the real motivation is money, says Michael Winship.

Too Many VA Delays, Too Many Wars

Graves at Arlington Cemetery

The scandal about excessive waiting times for U.S. veterans to get medical coverage is a fresh reminder about the delayed costs from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, indeed from the excessive use of the American military, as Michael Winship reflects on the message from Memorial Day.

The ‘Net Neutrality’ Fight Heats Up

fcc-symbol

The battle over the FCC’s plans for limiting “Net Neutrality” – and giving a speed advantage to the people who can pay a premium – is heating up as protesters bring the fight to Washington, writes Michael Winship.

The Limits of US Military Power

Seahawk helicopters fire flares as they approach the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln in the Atlantic Ocean, Aug. 2, 2012. (Photo credit: U.S. Navy Seaman Zachary A. Anderson)

Official Washington’s new conventional wisdom is that the Obama administration is weak because it won’t launch military strikes against every adversary around the world. But the reality is that military force has done little to project U.S. power since World War II, writes Lawrence S. Wittner.

The Fat Cats of Fast-Food

A protest for higher pay in the fast-food industry. (Photo by Annette Bernhardt)

Pay inequity has worsened across the U.S. economy, but perhaps nowhere more than in the fast-food industry where CEOs and other top executives fatten their compensation as their fast-food workers subsist on taxpayer-provided food stamps, as Michael Winship explains.

Hearing US ‘Allies’ Whine

President Barack Obama talks with Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko during a state call at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Japan, April 24, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Official Washington is abuzz with punditry about President Obama showing weakness around the world, with the old-reliable antidote being more Pentagon spending and more foreign military adventures. But this “debate” misses how real U.S. interests are served, writes ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar.

The Iron Law of Oligarchy Returns

Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-first Century."

America likes to think of itself as a land of the Great Middle Class with a government “of, by and for the people.” But that reality has changed drastically over the past several decades, as money and power have created a dominant American Oligarchy, writes Danny Schechter.