Monthly Archives: November 2013

‘Black Friday’ at Consortiumnews

From Editor Robert Parry: “Black Friday” – the day after Thanksgiving – is the traditional start of the Christmas buying season with billions of dollars spent on merchandise. We would modestly encourage readers of Consortiumnews to consider purchases of our books as well.

The Right’s Misconstrued Constitution

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Exclusive: The U.S. Supreme Court will rule on the right of a corporation owned by abortion opponents to assert its freedom of religion on health insurance, trumping a woman’s choice of birth control, another chance for the Right to expand corporate rights, says Robert Parry.

Double Standards for US War Crimes

Barack Obama, then President-elect, and President George W. Bush at the White House during the transition.

U.S. pundits cheer when some African warlord or East European brute is dragged before an international tribunal, but not at the thought of justice being meted out to George W. Bush or other architects of post-9/11 torture and aggressive war on Iraq, as John LaForge notes.

A Possible Path Out of Afghanistan

Afghan President Hamid Karzai greeting U.S. Army Lt. Gen. James L. Terry in Kabul, Afghanistan, in March 2013.

The unpredictable Afghan leader Hamid Karzai has issued new demands for the U.S. to meet if it wants to keep a smaller military force in Afghanistan after 2014, creating a possible route for the U.S. to finally end its longest war, writes ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar.

Neocon Name-Calling on Iran Deal

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain.

Exclusive: The neocons won’t give up on their agenda for more “regime change” in the Middle East, as they lash out at President Obama for daring to negotiate with Iran over its nuclear program rather than use it as an excuse for more hostilities, writes Robert Parry.

End-of-Year Fund Goal Set at $35,000

Journalist Robert Parry.

From Editor Robert Parry: Our end-of-year fund drive is always our most important, because it sets the parameters for how ambitious our investigative projects will be in the New Year. We are hoping to raise $35,000. Please contribute what you can.

JFK’s Embrace of Third World Nationalists

President John F. Kennedy reacts to news of the assassination of Congo's nationalist leader Patrice Lumumba in February 1961. (Photo credit: Jacques Lowe)

Exclusive: The intensive media coverage of the half-century anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s murder was long on hype and emotion but short on explaining how revolutionary JFK’s foreign policy was in his extraordinary support for Third World nationalists, as Jim DiEugenio explains.

Iran Nuke Pact Defies the Neocons

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani celebrates the completion of an interim deal on Iran's nuclear program on Nov. 24, 2013, by kissing the head of the daughter of an assassinated Iranian nuclear engineer. (Iranian government photo)

Official Washington’s still influential neocons are livid over President Obama’s interim nuclear deal with Iran and will keep up their sabotage fight. But the pact marks an important fork in the foreign policy road, showing that the U.S. government can still put American interests first, as ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar notes.

A Saudi-Israeli Defeat on Iran Deal

Secretary of State John Kerry (third from right) with other diplomats who negotiated an interim agreement with Iran on its nuclear program. (Photo credit: State Department)

Exclusive: The Saudi-Israeli alliance hoped to sink a deal between Iran and world powers that limits but doesn’t end Iran’s nuclear program, so the deal’s signing in Geneva is both a defeat for that new alliance and a victory for President Obama and diplomacy, writes Robert Parry.

Almost Thwarting Nixon’s Dirtiest Trick

President Richard Nixon.

In 1968, the public anger over the Vietnam War tempted GOP presidential nominee Richard Nixon to sabotage Democratic peace talks to seal his victory, a dirty trick that Saigon-based journalist Beverly Deepe nearly exposed before American voters went to the polls.